Proceedings of People's Enquiry Into CFMETR at Nanoose Bay, B.C.

By: Multiple Contributors

Price: $99.95

Quantity: 1 available

Book Condition: Very Good


209 pages including black and white photos of selected participants. The concept of the People's Enquiry was to gather information on the implications of CFMETR by inviting a number of experts in various fields to give papers on selected topics. The idea of having an open meeting was to provide the public with the answers which were denied them when the government turned down requests to hold a public meeting. Major-General Leonard Johnson (retired), one of the three distinguished panelists, said of the Enquiry, it was "an attempt to obtain facts, to inform the public, and to influence the activities that bear on the security of the people of Canada... Defence agreements can lead with changes in strategy and technology to unforseen and unintended consequences inimical to the security of Canadians. Because they are made and implemented in secret, beyond public security, such agreements are not subject to democratic control by an informed electorate, as all agreements affecting the lives of people should be. This is especially serious where nuclear weapons are involved." Moderate wear. Unmarked. Binding sound. Nice copy.

Title: Proceedings of People's Enquiry Into CFMETR at Nanoose Bay, B.C.

Author Name: Multiple Contributors

Categories: British Columbia,

Edition: First Edition

Publisher: Gabriola Island, BC, Canada, Gabriola Island Peace Association: 1986

Binding: Paperback

Book Condition: Very Good

Seller ID: 64400129

Keywords: Proceedings of People's Enquiry Into CFMETR at Nanoose Bay, B.C. Canadian Forces Maritime Experimental Test Range Georgia Strait Vancouver Island Nanaimo Parksville Lantzville Fairwinds Golf Course Nuclear Disaster Target Weapons 209 pages including black and white photos of selected participants. The concept of the People's Enquiry was to gather information on the implications of CFMETR by inviting a number of experts in various fields to give papers on selected topics. The idea of having an open meeting was to provide the public with the answers which were denied them when the government turned down requests to hold a public meeting. Major-General Leonard Johnson (retired), one of the three distinguished panelists, said of the Enquiry, it was "an attempt to obtain facts, to inform the public, and to influence the activities that bear on the security of the people of Canada... Defence agreements can lead with changes in strategy and technology to unforseen and unintended consequences inimical to the security of Canadians. Because they are made and implemented in secret, beyond public security, such agreements are not subject to democratic control by an informed electorate, as all agreements affecting the lives of people should be. This is especially serious where nuclear weapons are involved." Moderate wear. Unmarked. Binding sound. Nice Copyy,